Archives for category: Milwaukee Art Museum

One more from the Milwaukee Art Museum and its Santiago Calatrava designed building. One of my favorite spots in this building is the parking garage. The dramatic lines of the architecture upstairs are mirrored in the curved lines of the structure downstairs.

Garage 03-15_2 PM Parking garage 03-08 PM

I don’t think the white cars in these two drawings are the same and the views are different but I liked the way they lined up when placed next to one another. Not just the car but the lines of the garage ceiling as well.

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The drawing in my last post was of the admissions desk at the Milwaukee Art Museum. After paying for admission a guest brings their ticket to the ticket taker. It’s the life cycle of an admissions ticket.

The ticket taker.

The ticket taker

After a year long construction and renovation period the Milwaukee Art Museum has re-opened its permanent collection. Actually that happened back in November but… it’s nice to have it back.

The admissions desk inside the Santiago Calatrava designed wing of the Milwaukee Art Museum

The admissions desk inside the Santiago Calatrava designed wing of the Milwaukee Art Museum

Two drawings from the exhibition Uncommon Folk at the Milwaukee Art Museum. One is a porcupine by Felipe B. Archuleta. I don’t know what the body is made of but the quills look like dried grass with thick stems that have gone to seed. The thing I like about this sculpture is it’s much larger than I imagine a porcupine actually is, and it’s clearly smiling. The other is a carved wood snake painted red and cream. It’s by an unknown American artist ca. 1930.

I did a little stippling of my original drawings with MS Paint to help clarify the forms.

 

Root Snake, American ca. 1930

Root Snake, American ca. 1930

Porcupipne, 1978, Felipe B. Archuleta

Porcupine, 1978, Felipe B. Archuleta

 

 

Its time for more Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th-Century South Carolina. I worked with the very capable staff of the Georgia Art Museum to close the show and return the jugs to the various lenders. I really enjoyed this show when it was in Milwaukee and it was nice to be involved in the closing of the exhibition and to see the jugs one last time; again. I managed to do a few quick drawings while I was working.

 

03-06-02 PM 09-12 AM 11-02 AM

Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th-Century South Carolina closed last weekend at the Milwaukee Art Museum and now moves on to the Columbia Art Museum in South Carolina.  Everyone I talked to who saw this show liked it and now the good people of South Carolina can enjoy it too.

 

It’s been awhile since I posted a face jug drawing. There are quite a few face jugs displayed on clear acrylic shelves in a single large display case. The effect is really striking and allows for easy comparison between jugs. It’s a population of disembodied heads that are all different but share qualities as well.

I think this is the same jug I drew in my very first post on face jugs.

I was alone all day at work so I took a moment to make a drawing. Behind the scenes at the Milwaukee Art Museum!

 

Our work lights and a large print in the background.

Another face jug from the wonderful exhibition Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th Century South Carolina at the Milwaukee Art Museum.

 

This is one of the smaller face jugs. Bug Eyes!

Another crazy face jug from Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th-Century South Carolina at the Milwaukee Art Museum. Yes, it’s ears really are that far forward. Apart from the ears this one is creepy because there are no pupils indicated. There’s something disturbing about the completely dead stare this one has, like a dead fish.